Harold Schweizer

Poet and Explorer

Poem Shayma Interviewed by a Medical Red Cross Staff Member in Corigliano Calabro published in The Georgia Review

Read Shayma Interviewed by a Medical Red Cross Staff Member in Corigliano Calabro on the Georgia Review website.

An interview with Georgia Review's Laura Solomon about trauma and the obligations of poetry:

"The abandonment of the refugees by the crew of the ship that was supposed to bring them to safety replays a version of all the abandonments they have suffered and will suffer. To respond by writing about them is to counteract such abandonments. It is to say, I will not abandon you. It is to say, “Here I am,” as French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas describes our obligation to a person who suffers. So, that’s the setup for, and the obligation of, the poem."

Read the rest of the interview on the Georgia Review.


Poem "But Do Not Let Them Know You Were Alone When You Died." featured in Kenyon Review Conversations

A conversation about dying and solitude:

"The most difficult aspect about writing this poem is the thought that one dies one’s own death. And that the one thing the dying can do for the bereaved is to leave them without love, without grief and sorrow; that is, not to take love, grief, sorrow, those emotions that connect us to others, onto the long journey of dying. Not to diminish that for them by clinging to it. Not to be afraid to be alone. Hence the mantra of “leave,” above all, “leave,” four times repeated and alliteratively echoed throughout, especially in the repeated urging “let” which suggests letting go, leaving, and then one more alliteration in the word “look” which announces an unexpected turn."

Read the rest of the interview on Kenyon Review.